Welcome to UNBREAKABLE RECORDS

A List of Things We Lost is the rare vinyl blog of the sometimes corporeal, always ephemeral Unbreakable Records.

Nothing posted here will be found on a compact disc. Links are lingering somewhere at the end of each post; go find 'em!

No commercial endeavor is implied or supported by the posting of this music, it is for personal enjoyment and consumption only.

Looking for some killer tunes no one else has? Visit UR on Discogs.




Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Shakin' All Over

I first learned about Alfonso Lovo when I was reviewing his fusion masterpiece La Gigantona for our esteemed friends at Ugly Things.  Released by the Numero Group, the album fit firmly in the label's "cult cargo" tradition: self-financed, unreleased, bitingly funky.  From the liners, I learned of an earlier Lovo album, the mouthful-of-a-name Terremoto richter 6:25 - managuaTerremoto was recorded in 1972, when Lovo was a student here in the States, in response to a devestating earthquake in his home of Managua, Nicaragua.  It's not quite as strong as Gigantona, and shorter; but for a thrown-together response to an ecological crisis a continent away, it's pretty goddamn good.  Bristling with emotion, introspection, outward frustration, Terremoto also allowed Lovo to define his future musical evolution.  Many of the tracks act as a blueprint for Gigantona, with Latin-influenced acoustic guitar, burbling horns and lightly psychedelic touches.




Hey, why not shake things up?

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

MAY 10th BROOKLYN FLEA RECORD FAIR CONFIRMED!

It's on, and it's gonna be bigger than ever.  Held at the scenic, sceney Williamsburg Waterfront, the Brooklyn Flea Record Fair will once again have tons of vendors of both new & old vinyl, DJ sets, beer & more!



As always, Unbreakable will be there repping old school flavor with our table of crates heavy on Jazz, Rock, New Wave, Soul, and oddball assortments for your digging pleasure.  

Other collectors and some stores will be selling, too, but no one has the selection (or the prices!).  Be sure to check out the map & stop by UR first.

The labels represented include DFA, Secretly Canadian, Domino, Luaka Bop, Polyvinyl, Rough Trade, Warp, and Sacred Bones, just to name a few.  There will also be serious DJ sets from the likes of Sandra Electronics, Autre Ne Veut, Caroline Polacheck (from Chairlift) and Optimo.

Sponsored again this year by our good friends at the Red Bull Music Academy, which has its own fair share of one-and-done events worth checking out all month.

SEE YOU THERE!





Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Before Miami

Here's another dirty digging gem, literally - found sitting in a pile of "garbage" on 109th St. between Lexington & 3rd.  As I saw the owner of the Botanica throwing his records away, I verified that he wasn't looking to sell them before scooping up about 50 on my way to a meeting.  Nothing like showing up to discuss contract negotiations and tenure with both arms stacked full of dusty wax...

A couple of duds on here when Roy pushes the schmaltzometer to 11, but otherwise full of fiercely funky nuggets; this album as such is unavailable in its correct running order.

Rapid Eye Movement

Not quite as deep as Jazz Raga, not nearly as low-key as Bacchanal, Gabor Szabo's Dreams fits into his oeuvre - and the spirit of the times - perfectly, a lovely fusion of jazz hipness and psych weirdness.

Cello orchestration, flamenco overtones, spacey suites and one of the best Donovan covers ever . . . Dig it, and dig in . . .




I Don't Recall. . .



Little-known but uber-groovy electronic soundtrack from the mid-80s La Mama scene: drum machine, MIDI sequencers and early computer programming. . . ah, heaven. . . 

Ricci has been on the scene since the late '70s, though his early works still remain unissued.  Diverse instrumentation and thoughtful arrangements, placing him in the later pantheon of electronic/minimal/Avant-Garde classical composers.

Many of his more recent works are available for minimal cost directly from the composer himself here, so go ahead and support!  Sealed deadstock copies of Music From Memory were available for a short time (and 60 bucks) from Invisible City Editions, but no longer. . .  so follow it here to head down the rabbit hole with Ricci's blippy mnemonic device. . .





Monday, October 1, 2012

AN OPEN LETTER TO JACK WHITE

          September 30, 2012

          Dear Jack,

          I've been with you for a while now, having been a fan from the first note of the first song of White Blood Cells back in 2001.  Even as you made music or musical choices that I didn't love, I always tried to come see you play when you were in New York.   More than once I've called you our generation's only living guitar god.

         Saturday's show at Radio City Music Hall was bullshit.

          I respect any musician's decisions about his or her music.  No one should place expectations on how long a musician should perform for.  But when every other set on your tour has been twice the length of this sold-out show of 5,000 people, paying an average ticket price of $61, you're getting paid to perform a service.  That's called WORK, brother - around $300,000 for a single night ain't bad (yes, I know you don't get it all).  Playing half a concert and then sprinting off the stage means you're shirking your duties.

           I'm a teacher; if I show up and half my class is off the wall, won't listen, or talks over me... I don't get to walk out of the room and go home.  I have to figure out how to make it WORK, to do the best job I can for my students; they're the people I'm working for.  That's what people do at WORK - they do their job.  

            You did your job lazily, poorly.  Bad sound is a disappointing fact of live music.  Bad will towards the people who put you where you are is a disappointing, weak character trait.       

          You're an inventive, DIY kinda guy.  If it was, in fact, a sound issue, then fix it. You get to choose your venues.  You get a soundcheck.  You get a sound guy for the stage monitors, and another one for the audience.  You don't like the sound?  Fix it.  Don't pay Radio City their exorbitant venue fee for a hall that sounds like shit.  But don't charge your fans for something that's not their fault.  Tell us, the ones who helped make it a sold-out show, that you're gonna power through, because that's what rock n' roll's about - persevering, & rocking the fuck out of whatever bad situation you find yourself in.

            For the record, I was trying to start cheers of "Come back, Jack!" even when I knew by the house lights, the roadies turning off amps, that it was futile.  But by that point, the confused and dispirited audience wasn't into it - they were just ready to boo you.  Standing around for thirty minutes like a bunch of hopeful assholes, wondering why we just gave up our Saturday nights - and a fair amount of money - to see someone who doesn't seem to care about how our evening ends... it didn't sit well with people. That's the way to lose a lot of fans. 
         
          Anyway, you just lost this one.

          Long live the good times,

          Alex